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Boulton Paul Defiant I - top plan

Boulton Paul Defiant I - top plan


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Boulton Paul Defiant I - top plan

A top plan of the Boulton Paul Defiant I. From this angle the four gun turret could easily be missed, as it was in early clashes with the Luftwaffe.


Boulton-Paul Defiant

The Boulton Paul Defiant’s part in the early stages of World War Two have effectively been overshadowed by the Hurricane and Spitfire. However, the Boulton Paul Defiant was to play an important role in trying to stop the advance of the Germans into Belgium and France in the Spring of 1940. But against the fighter planes of the Luftwaffe it stood little chance once they realised that the plane had an Achilles heel when attacked.

The Boulton Paul Defiant had its main weaponry in a turret behind the pilot. In 1935, the idea of such a design for a fighter plane was still acceptable, though the armament of the Boulton Paul Defiant was soon to be overtaken by the forward facing weaponry carried by both the Hurricane and Spitfire.

The idea of placing the main weaponry of a fighter behind the pilot had first been espoused in 1935 – there were those who were supporters of the ‘power-operated multi-gun turret’. This idea had the advantage of allowing the pilot of the plane to fly the plane and leave the defence of the plane to the person who was in the multi-gun turret. This person also had the task of being the plane’s offensive officer.

The Boulton Paul Defiant first flew in August 1937. Its turret, though it contained awesome weaponry, was also responsible for increasing the drag factor of the plane which had an impact on the plane’s speed.

The Boulton Paul Defiant had a significant success in the German attacks leading up to the evacuation at Dunkirk. The sheer fire power of the Defiant took the Luftwaffe by surprise and by May 1940, the Defiant had shot down 65 German planes. However, the Luftwaffe soon learned that a Defiant attacked head on was an easy target and by August 1940 they were withdrawn from military daylight operations.

The Defiant carried on as a night fighter. In the aftermath of the attack on France, the Defiant was fitted with the A1 radar and in the winter of 1940 to 1941, the Defiant recorded more kills than any other night fighter plane. But as a daytime fighter it was simply outclassed and as fighter plane design developed, the Boulton Paul Defiant was simply overtaken.


Boulton Paul Defiant: An Illustrated History

Fighting over the beaches of Dunkirk and in the Battle of Britain, guarding the night skies during the perilous months of the Blitz, pioneering electronic countermeasures, and serving air-sea rescue roles all around our coasts, the Boulton Paul Defiant played a vital part through most of the Second World War, finishing it in the important target-tug role.

The Defiant is r Fighting over the beaches of Dunkirk and in the Battle of Britain, guarding the night skies during the perilous months of the Blitz, pioneering electronic countermeasures, and serving air-sea rescue roles all around our coasts, the Boulton Paul Defiant played a vital part through most of the Second World War, finishing it in the important target-tug role.

The Defiant is rightly considered Wolverhampton’s highest profile contribution to the war, and the most important product of Boulton Paul Aircraft. This book celebrates the contribution of the Defiant to the war in over 200 illustrations, most from Boulton Paul’s own archives, and many never published before. It exposes some of the false myths attached to an aircraft held in great affection by many of its crews. . more


Boulton Paul Defiant

The Boulton Paul Defiant’s part in the early stages of World War Two have effectively been overshadowed by the Hurricane and Spitfire. However, the Boulton Paul Defiant was to play an important role in trying to stop the advance of the Germans into Belgium and France in the Spring of 1940. But against the fighter planes of the Luftwaffe it stood little chance once they realised that the plane had an Achilles heel when attacked.


The idea of placing the main weaponry of a fighter behind the pilot had first been espoused in 1935 – there were those who were supporters of the ‘power-operated multi-gun turret’. This idea had the advantage of allowing the pilot of the plane to fly the plane and leave the defence of the plane to the person who was in the multi-gun turret. This person also had the task of being the plane’s offensive officer.The Boulton Paul Defiant had its main weaponry in a turret behind the pilot. In 1935, the idea of such a design for a fighter plane was still acceptable, though the armament of the Boulton Paul Defiant was soon to be overtaken by the forward facing weaponry carried by both the Hurricane and Spitfire.

The Boulton Paul Defiant first flew in August 1937. Its turret, though it contained awesome weaponry, was also responsible for increasing the drag factor of the plane which had an impact on the plane’s speed.

The Boulton Paul Defiant had a significant success in the German attacks leading up to the evacuation at Dunkirk. The sheer fire power of the Defiant took the Luftwaffe by surprise and by May 1940, the Defiant had shot down 65 German planes. However, the Luftwaffe soon learned that a Defiant attacked head on was an easy target and by August 1940 they were withdrawn from military daylight operations.

The Defiant carried on as a night fighter. In the aftermath of the attack on France, the Defiant was fitted with the A1 radar and in the winter of 1940 to 1941, the Defiant recorded more kills than any other night fighter plane. But as a daytime fighter it was simply outclassed and as fighter plane design developed, the Boulton Paul Defiant was simply overtaken.


One Unusual Fighter: Meet the Royal Air Force's Boulton Paul Defiant

This two-man interceptor plane was designed to shoot the Luftwaffe out of the sky—with a turret in the fuselage.

This unusual fighter was designed as an interceptor aircraft for the Royal Air Force and drew upon lessons learned in the inter-war years. Aircraft designers were transitioning from single-engine biplane designs, to more aerodynamically refined and faster monoplane designs.

Bombers like the British workhorse Vickers Wellington were armed with their own defensive weapons placed into turrets. RAF planners assumed that bombers would not need a fighter escort, being able to defend themselves with their own guns. But, as these developments were being both implemented and realized by the RAF, the assumption was that other European countries, namely the German Luftwaffe, would also transition to well-armed bombers.

The Boulton Paul Defiant was designed to intercept anticipated heavy German bombers. A group of fighters armed with turrets behind the cockpit could, in theory, fly in groups underneath or to either side of enemy bomber groups and concentrating their fire, bringing bombers down.

In order to meet these specifications, Boulton Paul designed a fairly clean plane with a large four-barreled turret. In order to catch ever-faster enemy fighters, the Defiant opted for a hydraulically-powered turret with a manual backup, rather than a purely manually-powered version. In order to ease pilot responsibility, designers opted for a two-man pilot-gunner design.

Two .303 Browning machine guns were set into either side of the turret. The turret ring was blocked at the rear, preventing the guns from firing into the tail assembly, and was prevented from firing into the propeller blades. In case the gunner was hit, he could turn the turret forward, pointing at a 19 degree upward angle, and give fire control to the pilot.

Though the Defiant airframe was relatively clean, it suffered from the drag caused by the turret, with degraded performance, along with the additional weight from the turret and gunner. In case of an emergency, the turret was the more dangerous of the two seats to be in—entry and exit was only possible when the turret faced the side, and the small opening meant that most pilots couldn’t fit through the opening with a backpack-style parachute. Instead, they were given a bulky, but lower-profile full-body parachute suit.

Early Success

The Boulton Paul Defiant was initially very successful against Luftwaffe fighter pilots. At the beginning of the Defiant’s service, the plane was mistaken for the similar-looking Hawker Hurricane. Thanks to this identification error, German pilots would attempt to bring down the Defiant from the rear, as the Hurricane had no rear-facing guns and was very vulnerable to attack. An attack from the rear played well to the Defiant’s turret guns, and Defiants scored a number of early successes against the Luftwaffe.

Once German pilots realized the Defiant/Hurricane identification error, the Defiant’s days were numbered. As a night fighter, the Defiant enjoyed some success when equipped with early onboard radar systems, but other, more capable fighters quickly replaced it.

Despite producing several Aces, the Defiant’s last role was as a target tug, pulling target gliders for RAF pilot target practice. Though the rotating turret design was successfully used by a number of bombers throughout the war, the Defiant’s peculiar arrangement benefitted more from enemy misidentification than from the plane’s inherent abilities.


Markings

There are decals for two RAF versions. The first of for a day fighter of No. 264 Squadron, Martlesham Heath, Suffolk, England, July 1940. This calls for a matt camouflage scheme of Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky. The second version if for an RAF night fighter of No. 151 Squadron, RAF Wittering, Cambridgeshire, England, February 1941 — calling for a paint scheme of overall matt Black.


Shipping daily! Shipping transit times during the pandemic are longer than normal, please be patient. Packages are moving very slowly through an overloaded, understaffed system during unprecedented levels of purchasing and a pandemic. We have been tracking our shipments. Most US addresses are now delivered within days however delays of up to 6 weeks can occur. Most Canadian addresses are delivered in 1-2 months, some longer. We are really sorry for the delay. Currently due to COVID-19 and its effect on international transportation, shipping is limited to addresses in the USA (50 states only) and Canada. Sorry no overseas shipments including APO, DPO, FPO, and US territories. If you place an international order, it will be refunded less PayPal fees.

During the Blitz of 1940-41, the Defiant was the highest scoring night fighter of the Royal Air Force.

This kit is a 1:16 scale flying model. Pre-1942 design, eligible for Society of Antique Modelers (SAM) contests.

This free flight rubber powered kit contains a full-size rolled plan, hand-picked printed balsa and balsa strip wood, rubber motor, EB propeller, EBM thrust bearing, clear plastic for the windshield, wheels, landing gear wire, and Easy Built Lite tissue in olive and light sky blue. To build this model you will need a building board, hobby knife, fine sandpaper, and glue.

Boulton Paul Defiant

Building Set for Rubber Power

Includes a hobby knife, 5 blades, straight point tweezers, 5.5" x 9" Self Healing Cutting Mat, Jet Instant glue, Jet Super glue, Jet Tips, glue stick, canopy glue/tacky glue, MagnaBoard XL&trade set, Minus Magnets 20 pack, and Rubber Powered Model Airplanes book. Save 20% off individually priced items.

Building Set

Excludes the book on rubber power and the glue stick. Includes a hobby knife, 5 blades, straight point tweezers, 5.5" x 9" Self Healing Cutting Mat, Jet Instant glue, Jet Super glue, Jet Tips, canopy glue/tacky glue, MagnaBoard XL&trade set, and Minus Magnets 20 pack. Save 20% off individually priced items.

Advanced Tool Set

Includes Sanding Stick with 120, 240, 320, 400, and 600 grit belts, Pull Saw Blade, K5 Heavy Duty Knife with beveled blade, Narrow Keyhole Saw Blades 5 pack, Curved Tip Tweezers, 1/16" Ball Tip Burnisher, Jewelers Needle Point Awl, Steel Ruler 6" x 1" with drill gauge, 15 piece drill set (1.05mm - 2mm). Save 15% off individually priced items.

Flight Pack for Rubber Power

Includes a 10:1 winder, moldable nose weight, FAI SuperSport rubber 32 feet each 3/32", 1/8", and 3/16" and 32 feet EBM 1/16" rubber. Save 20% off individually priced items.

Bernard Dion&rsquos Defiant, shown before and after applying his "war ravaged" finish.




"The Boulton Paul Defiant hinged tail group and wings held on with magnets." - Matthew Payne


"This was my son's first attempt at building one of your kits (with a little help from Dad)." - Thomas Moss


Boulton Paul Defiant

The Boulton Paul Defiant was a World War II fighter aircraft of the Royal Air Force built by Boulton Paul. The design of the aircraft was a flawed attempt to overcome the need to point the nose of a fighter at its target in order to bring the guns to bear. Instead of forward-facing guns, the Defiant was fitted with a powered dorsal turret equipped with four 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns. In theory, the Defiant would approach an enemy bomber from below and destroy it with a concentrated burst of fire. The concept was similar to the successful World War I Bristol Fighter but in practice the Defiant was fodder for the more agile Luftwaffe Bf 109s. It was quickly relegated to a night fighter role where it had considerable success before it was phased out of combat operations.

The Defiant was designed to Air Ministry Specification F.9/35 which required a powered turret as the sole armament. The Boulton Paul design was selected ahead of one submitted by Hawker. While the Defiant prototype first flew on August 11, 1937 and immediately went into production as the Defiant Mk.I, its entry into service was delayed such that only three aircraft had reached the RAF by the start of the war. The Mk.I was powered by the Rolls Royce Merlin III and a total of 713 were built.

No. 264 Squadron was the first to be equipped with the Defiant Mk.I in December 1939 and the first operational sortie came on May 12, 1940. On May 13, a flight of six Defiants were attacked by Bf 109Es five of the Defiants were shot down from a frontal attack. On July 19 six out of nine Defiants of No. 141 Squadron were shot down and the remaining three only survived due to the intervention of Hurricanes of No. 111 Squadron.

The Defiant was briefly successful as a day fighter when flying in formation with the visually similar Hawker Hurricane as it could surprise fighters attacking from the rear. The novelty of this trick soon wore off and the Defiant was moved to night fighting duties.

As a night fighter the Defiant achieved some success. The Defiant Mk.II model was fitted with the AI Mk IV airborne interception radar and a Merlin XX engine. A total of 207 Mk.II Defiants were built. During the winter Blitz on London of 1940-41, the Defiant was the highest scoring night fighter.

The Defiant was removed from combat duties in 1942 and used for air/sea rescue, training and target towing. A further 140 Defiant Mk.III aircraft were built this model lacked the dorsal turret and was used as a target tug. Many of the surviving Mk.I and Mk.II Defiants also had their turrets removed.

In May 1945, Martin-Baker used a Defiant to test their first ejection seat.

Boulton Paul also built the Blackburn Roc (from a design by Blackburn) which was the naval equivalent of the Defiant.


WI-The Boulton Paul defiant had forward facing guns?

From Tony Buttler’s ‘British Secret Projects, Fighters and Bombers 1935-1950.

Prototype Defiant K8310 eventually had its turret removed and in August 1940 was flown as an unarmed flying demonstrator for a fixed-gun version called P.94, which was intended for rapid production using many complete Defiant components. The P94 had the turret replaced by 12 0.303” MG disposed in each side of the wing centre section in nests of six – 4 20mm cannon replacing 8 of the 0.303” in two nests of two each were an alternative while the MG could also be depressed 17 degrees for ground attack work. P.94 had a 1,100hp Merlin XX, which offered a maximum speed of 360mph at 21.700ft, a sea level climb of 3,250ft.min and would get to 25,000ft in 8.1 minutes. To allow the type to act as a long range fighter two 30-gallon auxiliary tanks could be carried and in production the aircraft would use standard Defiant jigs. The P94 was never ordered but Boulton Paul also proposed to convert the now single seat Defiant prototype into a 4 cannon fighter demonstrator. The Air Ministry’s rejection of this idea was recorded at a company board meeting on 26th September 1940.

someone at BP obviously thought that either the wing would be modified or a new wing fitted

Just Leo

From Tony Buttler’s ‘British Secret Projects, Fighters and Bombers 1935-1950.

Prototype Defiant K8310 eventually had its turret removed and in August 1940 was flown as an unarmed flying demonstrator for a fixed-gun version called P.94, which was intended for rapid production using many complete Defiant components. The P94 had the turret replaced by 12 0.303” MG disposed in each side of the wing centre section in nests of six – 4 20mm cannon replacing 8 of the 0.303” in two nests of two each were an alternative while the MG could also be depressed 17 degrees for ground attack work. P.94 had a 1,100hp Merlin XX, which offered a maximum speed of 360mph at 21.700ft, a sea level climb of 3,250ft.min and would get to 25,000ft in 8.1 minutes. To allow the type to act as a long range fighter two 30-gallon auxiliary tanks could be carried and in production the aircraft would use standard Defiant jigs. The P94 was never ordered but Boulton Paul also proposed to convert the now single seat Defiant prototype into a 4 cannon fighter demonstrator. The Air Ministry’s rejection of this idea was recorded at a company board meeting on 26th September 1940.

someone at BP obviously thought that either the wing would be modified or a new wing fitted

Peg Leg Pom

Yulzari

Except that the Defiant was ring fenced for the RAF. If the RAF did not want it then the turret fighter concept was dead (no Roc hooray!) and there would be no Defiant and Boulton Paul would be building Spitfires, also just for the RAF.

The POD time for the Admiralty would be 1938 at the latest when they ordered Sea Gladiators as they could obtain no other single seat fleet fighter. They knew the Fulmar was a poor choice but it was all they could get and that took until 1941 to serve in quantity. Even that was developed from a 1934 design.

The Admiralty was right in 1938 to ask for a folding wing Sea Spitfire as their preferred choice. Just possibly an AH whereby extra Boulton Paul built Spitfire production allows some Hurricanes to be released as Sea Hurricanes or Gloster is shifted into extra Hurricane production instead of more Gladiator. But the FAA run the risk of beginning the war with Sea Hurricanes not yet built and interim Gladiators not having been made so you are down to Skuas, Rocs and Nimrods.

Now a POD could be specification 0/30/35 with the Boulton Paul P85 Sea Defiant winning the order instead of the Blackburn Roc. Boulton Paul built the Roc for Blackburns anyway so a P85 production line would be easier. But you still have a turret sea fighter. Albeit a Defiant instead of a Roc. Just perhaps, the Admiralty becomes unenamoured of the turret fighter concept and asks Boulton Paul to alter their forthcoming Sea Defiants to single seaters with wing mounted guns.


Watch the video: IL 2 Sturmovik COD The battle of Britain day by day 19071940 The Defiant day Massacre. (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kono

    do not try right away

  2. Skeat

    I believe there is always a possibility.

  3. Isidoro

    I'm not eager to watch ...



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